3.85-Carat Diamond is Found By Teen at Arkansas Park

By: Erika Watts - October 22, 2013

After Oklahoma teenager Tana Clymer heard about a boy who had found a 5-carat diamond at Arkansas’ Crater of Diamonds State Park in southern Arkansas earlier this year, she wanted to see if she would have any such luck. Tana, who is 14, ended up finding a whopping 3.85-carat diamond after searching for only two hours.

See the diamond Tana found, which is described as being about the size of a jellybean.

“I thought it was a piece of paper or foil from a candy wrapper,” Tana said of her find on Saturday. “Then, when I touched it, I thought it was a marble. I think God pointed me to it. I was about to sprint to join my family, and God told me to slow down and look. Then, I found the diamond!” According to park officials, Tana named the diamond “God’s Jewel.”

The park lets people keep whatever they find, so the diamond is Tana’s to do with as she pleases. “No two diamonds are alike, and each diamond finder’s story is unique, too,” assistant park superintendent Bill Henderson said. “What an experience for Tana to remember the rest of her life,” he said. “Tana told me that she was so excited she couldn’t sleep last night. She’s either going to keep the diamond for a ring, or if it’s worth a lot, she’ll want that for college.”

Tana’s family hasn’t had the diamond appraised yet, but Henderson said that a similar diamond found in 2006 was sold for $30,000.

Hundreds of diamonds are found at Crater of Diamonds State Park each year. The 37-acre park is an eroded surface of an ancient volcanic crater and is the only diamond-producing site open to the public. The largest diamond ever found at Crater of Diamonds was The Uncle Sam Diamond. The 40.23-carat, white diamond was found there in 1924, and so far, more than 75,000 diamonds have been found at the site since 1906.

Diamonds aren’t the only stones found at Crater of Diamonds State Park, either. Other gems found at the state park include jasper, amethyst, garnet, agate, barite, and quartz.

Images via YouTube

Erika Watts

About the Author

Erika WattsErika Watts is a former teacher, now stay-at-home-mom and contributing writer for WebProNews. When she isn’t busy navigating parenthood and writing, she enjoys watching college sports and reading. Follow Erika on Twitter @erikawatts83, Pinterest or

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